Luscious coconut macaroons—quick and gluten-free

Luscious coconut macaroons—quick and gluten-free

Did the Swedish vikings eat coconut macaroons? Well, not exactly. Coconuts are a relatively new part of the Swedish kitchen, and coconut macaroons—kokostoppar—seem to be a 20th century acquaintance. In 1902, Franska Frukt- och Blomsterimporten advertises a wealth of...
Semla—the mighty Swedish Lenten bun

Semla—the mighty Swedish Lenten bun

The Swedish Lenten bun is mostly known as a semla—or semlor in plural. You may know it by its other, more sinister name: Kingslayer. “Fat Tuesday should be prohibited and the Lenten bun forcibly expelled from Sweden, as it has committed regicide”. At least that’s what...
Kavring—Swedish rye bread

Kavring—Swedish rye bread

The Swedish rye bread kavring is not just for Christmas. It has been part of the Swedish diet for many hundreds of years. Well, at least we’ve eaten it since we got Skåne, or Scania, from the Danes in 1658. “Doctors consider the bread healthy and...
Klenäter—Swedish deep-fried Christmas pastries

Klenäter—Swedish deep-fried Christmas pastries

Klenäter are Swedish deep-fried Christmas pastries. To be honest, they’ve never been part of my Christmas tradition. Maybe that is because they are from another time—my father recalls them being considered old-fashioned when he was a boy. The slightly dry...
Saffron cake—not just for Saint Lucia’s day

Saffron cake—not just for Saint Lucia’s day

One of the favorite topics for rants in Sweden nowadays seems to be the Swedish postal system. Not without cause, but that kind of complaint is far from new. In 1918, a reader writes to newspaper Svenska Dagbladet, complaining about thefts in the postal system. The...