Swedish raspberry caves, or jam cookies

Swedish raspberry caves, or jam cookies

Actually, “Swedish jam cookies” sounds too plain. Let’s be daring and use the direct translation for hallongrottor — “raspberry caves”. That name sounds a bit more… evocative, no? While the cookie is perfectly innocent, I am not the only one who thinks...
Tango cake from the 1920s

Tango cake from the 1920s

Whipped cream, slices of pineapple in juice, and those glacé cherries — have you seen a cake look more retro than this Tangotårta, “tango cake”? To celebrate the 106th birthday of one of my favorite tango orchestra leaders, composers, and bandoneonistas —...
Strawberry cake — perfect for Midsummer

Strawberry cake — perfect for Midsummer

Some of the Swedish Midsummer customs may be a bit tricky to wrap your head around. Dancing around like frogs, anyone? But I’ll give you a simple pro tip so you’ll immediately fit right in. There are two things to swear about: the sun (or lack thereof) and...
Sans Rival — Swedish almond praline cake

Sans Rival — Swedish almond praline cake

Sans rival means unrivaled. That’s a hard feat for a cake to live up to — but if one cake can do it, then maybe it is this one. It even has a royal connection: “At least once a year, the king gets a homebaked cake. It is a big, magnificent Sans Rival,...
Cajsa Warg’s walnut cookies from 1755

Cajsa Warg’s walnut cookies from 1755

We’d probably call them “walnut cookies” today, but the actual name in Cajsa Warg’s cookbook Hjelpreda i hushållningen för unga fruentimber from 1755 is Bakelse i façon af walnötter, or loosely translated: “Cakes in the shape of...