Swedish beetroot salad (perfect for smörgåsbord)

Swedish beetroot salad (perfect for smörgåsbord)

Beetroot salad is my personal favorite on the Christmas smörgåsbord. It might be an irrational choice—here are all these delicacies, and I go for a weird pickle side dish? I don’t know if it is the stunning ruby color, the sweet yet slightly acidic taste, or the...
Gravlax—Swedish cured salmon with dill

Gravlax—Swedish cured salmon with dill

Swedes enjoy gravlax as an essential part of the festive Swedish smörgåsbord, such as Christmas, served with a sweet and strong mustard sauce. Although the cured fish mostly is eaten cold, you can enjoy it around the year. You can also serve it with potatoes as a...
Soft and spicy Swedish gingerbread cake

Soft and spicy Swedish gingerbread cake

Swedish gingerbread cake, or mjuk pepparkaka, is popular, especially around Christmas. But historically, it seems to have been eaten all around the year, as ads in Svenska Dagbladet in 1939 show by recommending it for the Easter coffee parties. The origins of...
Saffron pancake from Gotland

Saffron pancake from Gotland

Saffranspannkaka, or saffron pancake, is a delicacy most strongly associated with the Swedish island Gotland. The history of saffron pancake I’ll have to find more sources on Gotland’s saffron pancake, but let’s start with what we’ve got so...
Glögg—the Swedish mulled wine served at Christmas

Glögg—the Swedish mulled wine served at Christmas

Glögg, the Swedish mulled wine, isn’t something to toy with. It is the 13th of December, the day of Lucia, in 1957. The cream of the crop of the pharmacological institution has gathered to celebrate the Nobel prize winner and pharmacology professor Daniel Bovet....
Swedish saffron buns for Lucia

Swedish saffron buns for Lucia

What’s the best way to lure in new visitors? With saffron buns, of course. Or, lussekatter, as we often call them in Sweden. At least, that’s the trick that Skansen pulled when it wanted to establish its new Christmas market in 1906.  You see, the...