Swedish Christmas Box Giveaway

by | Nov 19, 2020

*Please note, the giveaway is now closed. You’re very welcome to comment but will no longer be entered into the drawing. You can always check out Skansen’s webshop to find many of the lovely things included.*

When times are dark, I get especially grateful for all the support from this blog’s subscribers. While this truly is a passion project, the work has its ups and downs and your encouragement nudges me on.

I wish I could send all of you a Christmas present to warm your hearts and lighten up the darkness. Instead, I am hosting this giveaway, where one of you will win a Christmas box of Swedish things. (I am working on a nice “comfort prize” for those who don’t win…)

So, what’s in the Christmas box? I have selected some of the most essential Swedish Christmas things I could find…

What You Can Win *Giveaway Closed*

From the second hand shop in Myrorna in Ropsten, we’ve got (all cleaned and in excellent condition):

  • Dalahästar — Dala horses. One of the two horses in this adorable pair is marked “Äkta Dalahemslöjd” and is made by Yngve Tjäder in Nusnäs in Mora in Dalarna. I assume the other one is, too, although it lacks the sticker.
  • Herring dish. This glass dish is perfect for serving herring, or any other dish you like, such as beetroot salad.
  • Cookie moulds. Use these to bake mandelmusslor or any other cookie you like.

From open air museum Skansen’s museum shop, we’ve got:

  • Dala horse tea towel. This beautiful towel made in Sweden from organic cotton is not just for Christmas.
  • Julstämning Christmas music CD. This set with three CDs contains many of the most popular songs for Advent, Lucia, and Christmas.
  • Butter knife in wood. I just thought it was too pretty to pass…
  • Traditional candle holders. These round, red candle holders have been a must at Christmas for as long as I can remember.
  • Horse and tomte (gnome) ornaments for your Christmas tree — or wherever you want to hang them. A bit of Sweden everywhere!
  • Moose and Dala horse cookie cutters. If you don’t feel like baking, they are also excellent to use as stencils for your crafts projects.
  • Polka sweets and Skansen’s blend of tea. These sweets are classis! The tea is Skansen’s black tea flavored with black currants and elderflower, to keep you warm.

Plus, I’ll put in a secret little something from me 🙂

How to Enter *Giveaway Closed*

  1. Comment on this blog post and let me know what Swedish dish (or drinks, cakes, cookies, or sweets…) you love to enjoy at Christmas. Do you have a favorite?
  2. Subscribe to the email list. This competition is only for Swedish Spoon’s email subscribers. If you aren’t already a subscriber, you can become a subscriber by entering your first name and email address below. You can of course unsubscribe at any time.

Rules and Info *Giveaway Closed*

  • This giveaway is in no way affiliated with Skansen or Myrorna.
  • This giveaway is not sponsored — I bought these products at full price (well, I got 10% off for being a member at Skansen).
  • Estimated total value: $80.
  • The competition lasts until November 25th, 2020, midnight Pacific time. I’ll choose a winner randomly from the comments, using a number generator.
  • I’ll reach out to the winner via email to get address details, etc. If I don’t get a response within two days, I reserve my right to choose a new winner, so please keep an eye on your inbox on the 26th!
  • I pay for shipping. I don’t think there should be any customs or other import/VAT charges as it is a gift, but if there is, I’m afraid you’ll have to cover that. If I send it and you don’t pick it up, I won’t send it again — shipping is expensive 🙁
  • If you win and you’d prefer for me to wait to send the package to you because of the current corona issues, I’ll wait with sending it until you feel it is a better time. Stay safe!
  • I’ll do what I can for the package to reach you before Christmas, but I can’t promise that it will. Fingers crossed.
  • You don’t need to buy anything to enter (I don’t have anything for sale, anyway). You do need to comment and to be a subscriber if you want to win, but you are of course welcome to unsubscribe at any time. The comment is how I know that you want to participate 🙂
  • You need to be above the age of 18 to enter, or else have your parent’s permission.
  • Void where prohibited.

I recommend that you check out Skansen’s drool-worthy webshop (no affiliation), where you’ll find many of the things included in this giveaway, and so much more!

But, first of all, enter this giveaway, will you?

196 Comments

  1. Ann-Britt Sharvell

    Pepparkakor with cheese, yummylicious

    Reply
    • Cathy

      I am just learning about my Swedish heritage. I really dont have anything but krumkake.. Looking forward to learning more.

      Reply
      • Debby Smith

        I’m so happy to find this site! I love all Swedish foods but I’m especially excited to do some baking for the holidays! I love cardamon and first up, I am looking for a cookie recipe that uses the spice.

        Reply
      • Cindy Austin

        my grandmother came from Sweden when she was a little girl. Sadly she died when I was eight so I could not ask her about her traditions. I know we always opened our Christmas presents on Christmas Eve and my Mom said that was one of her traditions

        Reply
        • Hayley

          Meatballs with potatoes and gravy and lingo berries, choklad böller and peparkakor!!

          Reply
        • Melinda Taylor-Kelly

          Pepperkaker is on top of the list, so is meatballs, potatoes and ham and farmers cheese.

          Reply
          • Claudia

            I love to enjoy kanelbullar at christmas. ♡

          • Angela

            Lefse – we eat lots and lots of it!

        • Shannon

          I am so happy to have ran across this website. I have a large amount of Swedish in my blood.
          A few of my favorite Swedish dishes and deserts are Rabarberkaka, Ostkaka, Kladdkaka, Köttbullar, Raggmunk and meatballs, to name a few!

          Reply
        • Joan

          I’m looking forward to learning to make more traditional foods. Like another commenter, all I can claim is krumkake!

          Reply
      • Melinda PetersonFluaitt

        Wonderful items Many of my Swedish grandparents items were given away now I am collecting for myself.

        Reply
        • Julie S

          Saffron buns!!

          Reply
    • Kris CT

      Princess Cake on Christmas eve is the highlight of dining table plus Lingon berry jam everyyyythinggggggg 🥰

      (I’m not Swedish but I’m such a Swedophile! In our household we have a 2:30PM fika.)

      Reply
      • Kirsten Fears

        Rommegrot, lutefisk, pepparkakor, lignon berries

        Reply
        • Paul

          Ost, potatis korv, lingon, kalv sylta, limpa,

          Reply
          • Janet

            Risgrynsgrot med Lingon and Kottbullar. (I’m not able to place the dots over the o but I know they should be there)

        • Anne

          Oh so many dishes to choose from! Gingerbread, glögg, meatballs.. 🙂

          Reply
      • Sherry

        Believe it or not, the holidays always included a special pickled herring salad. Never thought I’d miss it, but I do.

        Reply
        • CHRISTINE KLINGER

          Jag älskar Kladdkaka, Sillt, Ost, Knäckeböd!!!

          Reply
      • Madeleine Bouzon

        Prinsesstårta is the most delicious cake I have ever eaten. I plan to make one someday, lol, but for now the ones from Mormors Bageri are just perfect!!!!!

        Reply
      • Debra

        With you here. A very dear friend is Swedish and I fell in love with Sweden and all things related. Must say Semla is my favorite, while not a Christmas item. Glogg, herring at Christmas.

        Reply
    • Judy Benson

      I spread my Swedish joy whenever I can. I was humbled when I found my great grandmother’s grave 90 miles from where I live. I am so proud to be Swedish.

      Reply
      • Paula West-Mejia

        Limpa, cuminost,, sylta and Glogg! Oh, and Spritz.

        Reply
    • Carla Slayde

      I would so love to have my Dad’s homemade potato sausage and my Mom’s Osta Kaka!!! With lingonberries of course!! I am already a subscriber. Love the great information!!! God Jul!!!

      Reply
    • Jo jo

      My twins love Swedish meatballs with lingonberry jam

      Reply
    • robin neveu

      What a sweet women you are

      Reply
    • Sara Gidlund

      Janssons frestelse and Julmust 🎄✨

      Reply
      • Cathi

        Christmas has to have mormor’s pepperkakor!

        Reply
        • Uta Müller

          Princess Cake 🥰

          Reply
      • Rebecca Clemens

        My father was never interested in his family’s roots. I’ve just discovered they are Swedish. I’m trying to make up for lost time. I’m gathering recipes, but I’ve not tried any yet.

        Reply
    • Karen Sue Erickson

      Swedish Pancakes with Lingonberry Sauce

      Reply
    • Valerie

      Ha! Your blog name brings back many childhood memories. In the early 70s my grandmother’s Swedish cousins came to the US for a visit bringing gifts of children’s silverware to my brother, sister and myself. Through the years we lost all but one single spoon, forever known as the “Swedish Spoon”. We fought over this spoon every meal, every day by being the first to call out “Swedish Spoon”. Similar to calling shotgun to getting to sit in the front seat ❤️

      Reply
      • Isabelle Fredborg

        Valerie, that’s the sweetest story — thank you for sharing it, I’ll treasure it!

        Reply
        • Heather

          My grandmother was pure Swedish. Every Christmas Eve she would make Swedish meatballs and serve it with voort limpa bread. Her mom taught her to make potato salad which called for the potatoes to be soaked in vinegar after boiling.
          We also had the pickled herring and hard tack.
          She made Swedish jam cookies and piped beautiful S shaped cookies, too
          When we woke up on Christmas morning, she would make us Swedish pancakes with lingonberry sauce and cardoman coffee bread.
          So many wonderful traditions

          Reply
      • Melinda PetersonFluaitt

        .I love all things Swedish. Cookies, well I make Swedish gingerbread, Lucia braid breath, Swedish rye bread and many other things.

        Reply
    • Britnie Eddins

      I have not tried any Swedish food that I know of yet. I would love to try some Swedish foods especially the desserts they look amazing. My ancestors are from Sweden so I would love to know more about the culture and what foods they would eat. I love the name of your blog.

      Reply
    • Sharon Grunst

      I continue to learn more about my Swedish ancestry. We always had lutefisk on Christmas Eve and could not open gifts until the dishes were done. Lutefisk was always hard to get off the pans so we were impatient to get the dishes done. Our Grandma Olson made the best sugar cookies and had jars filled with the cookies when we arrived in Minnesota from Oregon. We still use her recipe to this day. I love your site and am learning so much.

      Reply
    • Lori

      Meatballs are my favorite part of my Swedish Christmas ❤️

      Reply
    • Alexandra

      Glögg, pepparkakor ohhh so much, but would also add salt liquorice as an all year rounder.

      Reply
    • Moira Thomson

      Swedish meatballs yummy

      Reply
    • Anne

      Home-made garlic herring, mustard herring, Hallands Fläder snaps and smoked salmon.

      Reply
    • Lorraine

      I do not really know any Swedish dishes but am looking forward to learning some x

      Reply
    • gregory anderson

      inlagd sill, korv, lefse, pepparkakor, swedish pancakes w) lingonberry sauce are my favorites.

      We eat swedish meatballs regularly through the year.

      Reply
  2. Donna Forbes

    What a lovely offer. Tradition at our house is to make Lussekatter for Luciadagen. Then for Christmas Eve, there is herring, cheese, knäckebröd, butter, ham, hasselbackspotatis, pickled beets, etc. Can’t wait !!

    Reply
    • Debbie Patrick

      ive never tried anything but would like to.

      Reply
      • Cynthia Downer

        Swedish creme

        Reply
      • Julie Richardson

        A treat to me is visiting a local cafe . They do the most delicious Swedish meatballs

        Reply
  3. Gabriella

    Knäck! My Yuletide favourite, and every dentist’s nightmare.
    Actually, I think I need to go make some now!

    Reply
    • Michelle

      I am learning about different traditions. I don’t think I’ve ever eaten a swedish dish. Now I’m going to go on the hunt for a recipe book. This is a beautiful set for the traditionalist and people like me who are learning different traditions. Thank you for offering it.

      Reply
  4. Anne Wildman

    My favourite is the Christmas Eve ham because the smell of it roasting fills the house and tells me Christmas is finally here. I would have said Christmas biscuits and the smell of cinnamon but we bake a lot with cinnamon so it doesn’t have that wow moment.

    Reply
  5. Carolyn Osland

    I enjoy Swedish meatballs, almond cake, lefsa, cod fish, herring, princess cake……I love it all. I love the traditions and the heritage..

    Reply
  6. Megan Fisher

    Peppakokker! I make at least 10 batches each Christmas. My fridge is full! We also make a ton of spritz,

    Reply
  7. Barbara

    We love cardamom bread

    Reply
    • Grethe

      Pepperkaker!
      We always bake gingerbread cookies before Christmas.

      Reply
    • Bethany

      We enjoy glogg very much!

      Reply
  8. Madeleine Bouzon

    Janssons frestelse!!! I can eat the whole dish! Mums!!!!!

    Reply
  9. Sandra

    We always serve my mom’s recipe for Swedish meatballs. And pepparkakor – everyone enjoys holding the cookie in their hand, making a wish, pressing on the cookie til it cracks, three pieces and your wish may indeed be granted! If not, we still have the cookie!!

    Reply
  10. Carla Gade

    Thank you for the giveaway. I was happy to discover your website/blog. Our family enjoys pepperkakar and Swedish twists.

    Reply
    • Cathy

      I am just learning about my Swedish heritage. The only food I make is krumkake. Looking forward to learning more. Thank you.

      Reply
  11. Jen Atkins

    I have yet to have a traditional Swedish Christmas dish! I still have a lot to learn about my heritage. This package is beautiful.

    Reply
  12. Françoise Murcott

    I am french and I have been converted by Scania (the factory in Angers) girls to all the swedish goodies :pepparkakor, gravadlax,and so many more .I have even converted my family to Glögg for Christmas. Sadly,with lockdown at the moment we miss all the festive happenings !!!

    Reply
  13. Jill Timmerman

    We love making pepparkakor. The house smells so wonderful when we do and they go really great with a nice hot cup of coffee. My great grandfather came to the US from Sweden and I still have relatives there. As I get older I really want to connect with my Swedish heritage and have been a lot through cooking. We also love to make Swedish meatballs and when they are cooking the aromas remind me of my childhood when my grandma would cook.

    Reply
  14. Diane Yanosik

    We always celebrated Christmas Eve with Fläskkorv and boiled potatoes after church services.

    Reply
  15. Bonnie Rider-Martin

    No “special” dish. Just missing my “Aunt Carrol” and all the Swedish treasures that she brought into my life. Especially her friendship.

    Reply
    • Patricia

      Swedish meatballs and pepperkakor are wonderful. 💜
      Now wishing myself good luck 🍀

      Reply
      • Meghan Mackey

        I fill my home with scandi decor for jule every year so a sweet pair of dalas would be right at home on my mantle 🤗.
        I couldn’t pin down a single recipe but pepparkakor, cinnamon buns and gingerbread never go in wrong 😋

        Reply
  16. Kari

    We always have smorgasbord for Christmas eve, and love all of it (from fika to aquavit to herring to pepparkakor).

    Reply
  17. Tabea

    My favourite dish is gravadlax – but meatballs are good, too. Thanks for the giveaway!

    Reply
  18. Jacque McPherson

    Definitely pepparkakor! So delicious!

    Reply
  19. Christina Wessling

    Knäck, Glögg, Pepperkaker are some of my favorites around Christmas

    Reply
  20. Kay Myhrman-Toso

    Köttbullar, pepparkakor, sandbakleser, glögg, limpa, cardamom bread or rolls, fruit soup…Ummmmm!
    ,

    Reply
  21. Marissa

    So fun! Swedisbh meatballs, potato sausage, and all the cardamon and almond flavored goodies. 🙂

    Reply
  22. Rob Hnatuk

    Hands down…..Homemade Glogg! It makes the house smell festive.

    Reply
  23. Judy

    Swedish meatballs, the cheese most kinds, the chips and so much more

    Reply
  24. Joni Parker

    Pepparkakor, pickled herring, Swedish meatballs, I even like lutefisk!

    Reply
  25. Karin Calvert

    As a child my favorites were spritz and pepparkakor, made by my aunt under my attentive gaze. As an adult, gravlax with dill-mustard sauce with my late husband’s grandmother’s pickled cucumbers, and my limpa bread.

    Reply
    • Linda Öhrn P.

      Your blog is like a warm letter from home! I also love Skansen’s butik! ( website is in English, too. My mom’s cardamom braid was the best, made by feel,.. ( I use a recipe we made watching her – also her Swedish meatball recipe!). Tompten decorated old dishes set my table and old Swedish jultid embroidery decorate the house, with the rest of my Swedish Tomtar .

      Reply
  26. Sara S

    My grandparents made glogg and limpa staples at our holiday gatherings, it’s a tradition that I continue, because no celebration is complete without them!

    Reply
  27. Evan

    Favorites are breads, yulekage and cardamom in particular. At least when I’m not avoiding carbs…

    Reply
  28. Barb Zola

    Beetroot salad – my brother makes the most amazing! Someday I will make it home for a Christmas celebration.

    Thank you for sharing the history behind these recipes, it’s amazing and so very interesting.

    Reply
  29. Deborah

    How to choose just one thing? For me, it would definitely be pepparkakor, with Swedish meatballs & lingonberries, and rice pudding as runners up!

    Reply
    • Carol

      I especially enjoy Christmas when we enjoy so many Swedish specialties. I make pepparkakor, Swedish tea ring and knackebrod . We also enjoy lutefisk, herring and rice pudding.

      Reply
  30. Paula

    Midsommar cake 🍓 yum, Kanellbullar, blabarsbuller, and fabulous kladdkaka. As you can tell fika is paramount. Can’t wait for my next visit to see my son in Torsby Lingonberries are ace and so easy to find ❤️

    Reply
  31. Dana

    I love pepparkakor 🙂 So delicious in the winter, especially at Christmas.

    Reply
  32. Donna

    Pepparkakor and Vitale brod

    Reply
  33. Bethany

    These items are SO lovely! 😍

    Reply
  34. Marion

    Køttbollar and smørebrød

    Reply
  35. Rachel

    I ama FarMor and love visiting Sweden 🇸🇪 for Christmas. I love trying all the good food my daughter in law makes!

    Reply
    • Kristi Smith

      I love krumkaka, struva, tearing, Swedish meatballs. So good!

      Reply
  36. Janet

    Swedish Glogg; Swedish Smorgasbord is always a classic favorite at the Minneapolis American Swedish Institute (ASI).

    Reply
  37. Ruth

    My great grandparents came from Sweden. My grandfather used to speak Swedish but it wasn’t taught in the home. I wasn’t raised with all the cooking and decorating. I’m the only one in my family who does. I taught myself how to sing Stilla Nat.

    Reply
  38. Sandie Smith

    My mother’s family (Olson) held Thanksgiving every year in Kingsburg, CA. I remember as a small child running through my great aunt’s kitchen to grab a cardamon bun many times during the day. They were in their own bin. These buns have become a family tradition. My grandmother, my mother, my sister, my niece, and now my own daughter. The rest of the family appreciates their efforts. We all have dishes, Dala horses, and inherited loved treasures from our grandmother and mother. We truly treasure our heritage.

    Reply
  39. Mary McCarthy

    Thank you so much for this amazing opportunity to win a lovely gift. If I win I am giving most of this to my 89-year-old Swiss Aunty. Mary Ender. She would be thrilled. God Bless and stay safe.

    Reply
    • Mary McCarthy

      I forgot to add that we have Lintzer Cookies at the holidays.

      Thank you again for this wonderful offer.

      Reply
  40. Nancy Mychasiw

    I’m so excited to have found this site. I’m Swedish from my Mothers side. Her Grandparents and Mother, immigrated to the US first (Wadena, MN),and then along with many other Swedish families moved to Saskatchewan, Canada, which was also then named Wadena.
    One of my favourite cookies that I make every year are Halongrotton. 💗

    Reply
  41. Louise

    What a lovely array of things! I don’t know much about Swedish food or culture so it’s interesting to try new things. Cookies would be my first choice!
    Blessings ❤️

    Reply
  42. Marion Payne

    Almond cake is a must at Christmas, always reminds me that the festive season is here, Merry Christmas, stay safe!

    Reply
  43. J L Bohman

    I luv Cardamom dinner rolls. Esp the ones my Mom made for my Dad who was a first generation Swede. My Dad’s Mother who was a Swedish immigrant taught her how to make them

    Reply
  44. Sharon McConway

    I love julmumma but haven’t tried it yet with cinnamon on top. Think that will have to be tried for sure this Christmas

    Reply
    • Aurore

      Hello

      I think pepperkakor are my favourites but kanelbullar are tasty too. The problem with swedish cooking is that mostly everything is tasty 😋

      Reply
  45. Marilyn Maier

    When I lived in MT the Sons of Norway always had a wonderful entertainment and bake sale during the holidays. I miss that so much! I’ve baked krumkaka and luccikatter but I miss so many other delights❤️

    Reply
  46. Anni Smith

    My dad always makes us lutefisk served with lingonberries and rice for Christmas Eve supper. There is always a nut hidden in the rice, and whoever gets the nut in their serving is supposed to be king for the day/the next to get married/whatever rule we make up that year. At New Years Eve, my dad will often make us Swedish meatballs. For dessert we always have a delicious persimmon pudding, which was his mom’s recipe:

    Reply
  47. Rhonda Dunlap

    It’s still November but I’ve already made glögg!! I love pepparkakor and we always have korv, ham, and julgröt on Julafton! I can’t wait!! <3

    Reply
  48. Karen

    Thanks for the chance to explore Swedish culture. I do try to have some Swedish cookies at Christmas.

    Reply
  49. Amber Nelson

    I am looking forward to making a saffron cake this year for Christmas, as well as the Scanian gingerbread cookie recipe from the Nordic Baking Book!

    Reply
  50. Darren Measor

    Has to be the Julbord and Jansson’s temptation!! Cannot be beaten!

    Reply
  51. Darren Measor

    Has to be Jansson’s temptation!

    Reply
  52. Fiona hunter

    So excited. Fell in love with Sweden on a cruise visit last year. I have completely fallen for the decor and can’t wait to come back! *was meant to be there this year but covid spoiled that

    Reply
    • Lori Beth Houff

      I love pepparkakors(ginger thins) and struvas (rosettes) via my dad’s side of the family and almond butter rings on my mom’s side.

      Reply
  53. Deborah Albee

    My favorite Swedish Christmas treat is Long on berry hearts. So pretty and taste delicious!

    Reply
  54. Deborah Albee

    Lingonberry heart cookies.
    I hate autocorrect

    Reply
  55. Lori Beth Houff

    I love pepparkakors(ginger thins) and struvas (rosettes) via my dad’s side of the family and almond butter rings on my mom’s side.

    Reply
  56. Rebecca Swanson

    We love vegetarian Swedish meatballs with mashed potatoes and gravy.

    Reply
  57. Tony

    What a beautiful package – I especially like the look of those candles. I miss rock-hard gluten-free pepparkakor. I hope to make katalanar this Christmas if I can find a good recipe.

    Reply
  58. Jim Anderson

    It is time to bake some limpa. I use my mom’s recipe, actually she wrote it out twice.
    Actually they don’t agree. And they do not seem to be complete. I have learned to fill in the gaps by reading printed recipes. But I follow her blend of fennel, anise, and caraway and include orange rind too.

    Limpa is one of my favorites.

    Reply
  59. Virginia

    My tradition is a Luciadaggen coffee for my friends. At least 16 different cookies and buns. My grandmother’s herring was the best.

    Reply
  60. Virginia Mead

    My tradition is a Luciadaggen coffee for my friends. At least 16 different cookies and buns. My grandmother’s herring was the best.

    Reply
  61. Karen Nelson

    I am Swedish on my father’s side. Every Christmas we would have ostakaka with lignon berry sauce, ludfisk, spritz cookies, and a Swedish tea ring. Such lovely memories. I still make spritz and the tea ring for the holidays.

    Reply
  62. Karen

    I am Swedish on my father’s side. Every Christmas we would have ostakaka with lignon berry sauce, ludfisk, spritz cookies, and a Swedish tea ring. Such lovely memories. I still make spritz and the tea ring for the holidays.

    Reply
  63. Susan Martin

    Christmas Eve meant meat balls,ham, lingon berries,herring, brown beans, rice pudding, cardamom buns, and aunts and uncles and grandmothers and cookies and glogg and laughter and love.

    Reply
  64. Christina Friesen

    I love glogg and pepparkakor! I had them for the first time when I was in Stockholm in 2018 and they definitely put me in the holiday spirit. 🙂

    Reply
  65. Rita

    We live in Sydney Australia and our traditional Christmas starts at 3pm on the 24th with Kalle Anka and Glogg. Then we have a full julbord- meatballs are the favourite every year! It doesn’t matter if it is 40 degrees outside (and it can be!) we cook (and melt!) We used to make a pepparkakshus for the kids, but it would just topple over in a day or so as the humidity gets into the walls. Would love some Swedish decorations here “down under”!

    Reply
  66. Patt

    Christmas Eve we have herring, bost, Pepparkakor, ham Rice Pudding with the Almond inside, Jansson’s temptation, spritz and always GLOGG ! Christmas morning we have Swedish Pancakes with Ligonberries. I am 85 yrs young and have taught all of my 10 grandchildren how to make the pancakes to pass on the traditions.

    Reply
  67. Ken Skahn

    Mazariner (Swedish almond tarts) with coffee.

    Reply
  68. Allan

    Ive now lived in Australia for longer than I lived in Sweden, I grew up in Västerås. I’m still not used to having a warm Jul. I really miss the annual Jul Marknaden (Christmas Market), Lusse Bullar, knäck, glöggen and seeing Christmas Stars (Jul Stjärnor) in all the windows. Thank you for all you work with the blog, you’re doing a great job, now I’m off to make some Hasselbacks Potatis.

    Reply
  69. Alison

    Pepparkakor with delightfully warmed, and warming, glogg!

    Reply
  70. Pamela Schmeckpeper

    We love the limpa bread, lingonberries and glogg. 🙂

    Reply
  71. Joy Wagner Dalton

    We have a traditional smorgasbord on Christmas Eve. Glögg, Swedish meatballs , pickled herring, shrimp and pepparkorka.

    Reply
  72. Norma Larson

    The only Swedish recipe I have made so far is cardomom braids. My husband and I love them! He grew up in a community where swedish foods could be purchased at all the markets, I wasn’t so lucky!

    Reply
  73. Jess Robertson

    Peppakokker, fruit soup and rice pudding!

    Reply
  74. Vanja

    We love FIKA , cinnamon rolls, kakka cake is my daughte’r favourite, today is family celebration and I will be making this delicious recipe you kindly shared Hasselback potatoes.
    Also love patter colour of your textile very much.

    Reply
  75. Carol

    We invited local friends in our little village in Norfolk to a traditional Swedish Christmas Eve. They loved it and would like us to do it every year! A lot of work though and not possible this year anyway. But we are thinking of having a Swedish midsummer celebration on the common next year if possible. We used to have a midsummer supper every year in our cottage. A very popular event. Jonsson’s Frestelse was always a big favourite.

    Reply
  76. Christine

    Would Love to get your e-mails..!!!!

    Reply
  77. Monika

    Knäck and Pepparkakor!

    Reply
  78. Karen

    I love your recipes! My late husband’s family is of Swedish descent, so I learned about the traditional holiday food from their annual Christmas Eve Smörgåsbord. My favorite dish is Lutefisk! I will miss it this year.

    Reply
  79. Emma

    Oh my goodness, what lovely treats absolutely adorable.

    Reply
  80. Ulla Woolley

    Hej. We usually have smrörgåsbord, so meatballs, jansons, skinka, fläsk korv, kavring, painskorv, sill och kokt potatis. Vi dricker glögg och julmust. Vi bakar lussekatter, pepparkakor och mjuk peppar kaka. Tack så mycket för detta erbjudandet. God Jul. Stay safe and thank you for this blog.

    Reply
  81. Sally

    We all love the smorgåsbord followed by sju sorters kakor! I have wanted to make the mandlemusslor but did not know where to get the tins. Will have to check out the Skansen website. Thank you for sharing your recipes!

    Reply
  82. Elisabeth McKenzie

    Its not Jul without pickled herring, Jul ham, meatballs and red beet salad. Yummy!

    Reply
  83. Eric and Christine Blahut

    Family recipe favorites include fruit soup, gröt, herring salad, plättar, almond cookies made in the little tins, limpa and kladkakka. Fortunate enough to have a copy of the family cookbook and memories of my Swedish family from Torhamn. Thank you for sharing your recipes.

    Reply
  84. Kristina Hartley

    Lussekatter and rice porridge! It’s just not the Christmas season without them. And Spritz cookies–I guess they’re not really Swedish but my mother and grandmother always made them, and I associate them with a Swedish Christmas.

    Reply
  85. Janet

    Risgrynsgrot med Lingon and Kottbullar. (I’m not able to place the dots over the o but I know they should be there)

    Reply
    • Suzanne jewison

      I love meatballs potato and lingon berries but my favorite is a thing lakkris

      Reply
  86. Kirsti Ryall

    Revbensspjäll and Julgröt are two favourites. But I can’t think of a dish I don’t like to be honest! (But maybe that means I am just a greedy gut 😄)

    Reply
  87. Irene Sandberg

    We have enjoyed krumkake over the years and our daughter is trying new recipes this year!

    Reply
  88. Susan

    Love all things sweedtish! Did not know there is a herring dish🐟 I will have to get one😍🇸🇪

    Reply
  89. Sherry

    Holiday limpa. I found this site a couple days ago while looking for a limpa recipes. Your Kavring recipe was the only recipe I found that gave instructions for scalding some of the flour ahead of time. Some recipes stated that it could be done, but I never would have thought to add the spices at this time. My great Grandmother was first generation Swedish-American and grew up in a Swedish community in the Midwest. My mother always talked about her baking limpa and eating it warm out of the oven. I thought about making it many times but have never done it. My Swedish roots are close enough to know about them; but, far enough removed that they didn’t have much influence. It is very exciting for me to find a place to learn about Sweden. Looking forward to this new adventure.

    Reply
  90. Stephanie

    Princess cake is the best dessert I remember

    Reply
  91. Emily

    I’m going to try my hand at making Swedish gingerbread cookies, pepparkakor (I think they’re called) 🙂

    Reply
  92. Wayne Schmidt

    Pepparkakor And decorating the Yule gran.

    Reply
  93. Alissa

    We make batches and batches of lease every year!

    Reply
    • Alissa

      Lefse…lol

      Reply
  94. Laura

    Pepparkakkor. Anytime we have a visitor or a playdate out comes the tin. Admittedly, it’s an IKEA tin purchased at our yearly visit to the store to check out Christmas decorations but still, the flavour is so reminiscent of happy times at a wonderful time of the year.

    Reply
  95. Charles Elliott

    What a lovely assortment. This will be my first Christmas back in the US and I’ve just completed my stash of equipment for making my family’s traditional recipes. I’ll start with potatiskorv and lefse. Cookies will include spritz, fattigmann, rosettes, krumkake, sandbakkels, and berlinerkranser. I’ll be adding goros and pepparkakor to this year’s cookie platter.

    Reply
  96. Eleanor Woolf

    Christmas Eve at my Swedish friend’s house always meant a huge buffet with a big dish of Jansson’s and glasses of glögg. I love Jansson’s, and have never managed to cook it as well as my dear friend (who returned to Sweden a few years ago)

    Reply
  97. Ammirato Lynn

    Knäck and pepparkaka. Reminds me of my Mormor 💙💛

    Reply
  98. Pam Lawrence

    I would love to try some traditional Swedish foods at Christmas time, but as yet haven’t had the chance!

    Reply
  99. Elizabeth

    I love the Swedish chocolate cake and the butter cookies

    Reply
  100. Carol schuldt

    My favorite thing that my grandma used to make was ost kaka served with lingonberries. My father liked lutefisk. Served with mustard sauce. We had that every Christmas and celebrated santa Lucia .

    Reply
  101. Sonja Schneider

    Pepperkakkor was always my favorite I would get from my grandmother! I still buy them in a pretty tin! Also I always make Swedish snowball cookies. Have tried Lutefisk did not care for that though. So I guess it is the sweets for me!

    Reply
  102. Belinda

    I don’t have a tradition (yet) of eating a particular Swedish food (does IKEA food count haha…), but I would love to have cardamom buns this Christmas…as good as the ones I ate in Stockholm when I visited a few years ago! I have made pretty decent cinnamon buns but maybe now I will have to give the cardamom ones a go…

    Reply
  103. Jana

    When I visited Sweden I didn’t want to leave. I visuel during summer and winter. I love Hallongrotta, shrimp salad sandwiches, Princess cake, piggelin popsicle, smoked Mackerel, blueberry soup with Mandel kakor!
    I visited Skansen! I love Sweden so much I married a Swede! I try to bake and cook Swedish dishes too!

    Reply
    • Jana

      And pickled herring with dill on hard boiled eggs!

      Reply
  104. Christine Mountford

    I’m not Swedish but do enjoy eating and trying food from all over the world. I love Swedish meatballs with lingonberry jam and am a bit ashamed to say I ate a whole tin of pepperkakkor in one sitting!

    Reply
  105. Sarah Bambach

    Glögg, when we put up our Christmas tree, St Lucia buns for December 13, and a smörgasbord for Christmas Eve.

    Reply
  106. Phillip lambert

    My 6 year old daughter is a big Swedish meatball fan she loves them

    Reply
  107. Birgit Höhn

    Glogg 😊

    Reply
  108. Robin

    My great grandmother’s anise cookies and frutsuppa

    Reply
  109. Carla Hedstrom

    Lucia buns and meatballs!

    Reply
  110. Denise

    I’ve always enjoyed the herring, Swedish meatballs and of course Kringle krumcake

    Reply
  111. Sheila

    My grandpas from Umea, Sweden. I love to do the genealogy of the Erickson family. I learned how to make Lefsa this year. And krumaka. Swedish meatballs are a big hit. Luteifisck. My grandpa Elmer when he was alive. Said it would put hair on your chest. Lol. My dad makes rosettes every year. And they are gone before you know it. Also my dad loves sardines. Yuck. I love my Swedish heritage.

    Reply
  112. Shelby Busse

    I love pickled herring! I also love pickled beets. My father-in-law and I would share a jar of pickled beets and a jar of pickled herring every Christmas. Nobody else would eat it but we didn’t care; there was more for us to share! Sadly he has been gone for many years now. I still buy and eat our favorites in his memory every Christmas.

    Reply
  113. Cindy

    Pepparkakor cookies. My Aunt always made them. So many great memories.

    Reply
  114. Jessica Staley

    Swedish heirloom cookies

    Reply
  115. Helen

    Lucia buns are a favourite here.

    Reply
  116. Raechel

    Cardamom bread and Swedish meatballs with red cabbage,

    Reply
  117. Lynda Lee Peterson

    My birth family is all Swedish. We all have different Favorites. Even my BIL, who is not Swedish, has his favorite – limpa bread. My daughter’s favorite is potato sausage. Granddaughter loves krumkake (don’t we all?). My dad has driven miles for lutefisk, but always said my Mom made it the best. We sure miss her as she helped keep our heritage alive. She made sandebakkels and my favorite, trokkanner. My grandmother’s girlhood home is now at Gammelgarden on display.

    Reply
  118. Danielle Bertschi

    I love gingerbread dallhorses and keumkake!!

    Reply
  119. Danielle

    Krumkake and gingerbread dallhorses!

    Reply
  120. joyce wilson

    Swedish meatballs

    Reply
  121. Mitch

    Wow 😳

    Reply
  122. Lorri

    Love all the holiday cookies!

    Reply
  123. BJanie

    I love to make krumkake…plus so many cookies.

    Reply
  124. Cass

    This is the coolest giveaway! My husbands grandparents are Swedish, we’re planning a dream vacation to Sweden someday 🙂

    Reply
  125. Priscilla Almquist-Olsen

    For julafton my favorites are meatballs with lingon, bondost on knäckebröd, fisk pudding, inlagd sill, corn pudding, bruna böner, sylta. Glögg, spritz and pepparkakor, cardamom coffee bread. Risgrynsgröt (I have gotten the almond serveral times.). My maternal grandparents and my paternal great grandparents all emigrated from Sweden. I studied at the University of Stockholm for one year many years ago and I visit my relatives and friends almost every year now. Sweden is forever in my heart.

    Reply
  126. Jennifer Craig

    Love the cheery little dalahästar. Our summer trip to Stockholm was cancelled so no Skansen with friends, no fika out in the archipelago . . . . Ah, well! Next year will be better, I’m sure.

    Reply
  127. Louise

    My husband is Swedish and we try incorporate food and culture whatever we do.
    As a family we love a smorgasbord followed by a Prinsesstårta. We always have a bowl of Marieanne somewhere.

    Reply
  128. Tania Fellows

    My favorite is Swedish mulled wine! I had it first time in San Diego Park Christmas festival. I saw the Santa Lucia procession and heard Swedish Christmas songs. ❤️❤️❤️ It’s been my favorite drink ever since!

    Reply
  129. Karina Porras Brunberg de Ohep

    It has always been a Swedish Christmas for my family, starting with Pepparkakor, drömmar, finskapinnar, then Lussekatter and the enticing smell of glögg on December 13. The fantastic and delicious Julbord, which of course has the beautiful, carefully prepared and savory Julskinka as centerpiece, needs all the complementary flavors supplied by köttbullar, dillpotatis, Janssons, knäckebröd… aand we would always have a mazipan cake and Pepparkaka for dessert.

    Reply
  130. Jannike

    Meatballs with rödbetssallad is the best!

    Reply
  131. Mark G

    Wow! What an amazing assortment of Swedish goodies. I would buy everyone of these. I try to make my holidays more and more Swedish every year. Sadly, with the pandemic I don’t think they will be having the yearly SWEA Xmas Fair here in Southern California. I will have to get my goodies elsewhere this year.

    Reply
  132. chiemishanti

    I love lussekatte ( saffransbröd) for holiday season!

    Reply
  133. Nancy

    It’s been such a comfort to read all the above comments. Missing my father this holiday season but I am a lucky lady to have had him
    pass on all the Swedish traditions from my Grandfather Lars. It seems others here know those traditions too. We just picked up both fresh and pickled herring today and will enjoy tomorrow, Thanksgiving, with limpa. Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

    Reply

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Hej och välkommen!

My name is Isabelle. Here at Swedish Spoon, you’ll find Swedish food history, tried-and-tested recipes, and a lot of obsessing over great butter. You can also expect some travel tips.

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